Argonne National Laboratory

Science Highlights

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A diagram showing the “spiral” of noncollinear magnetic orientations (in pink) of a nickelate material next to a manganite material (Image by Anand Bhattacharya/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Scientists discover magnetic “persuasion” in neighboring metals

Certain materials can be swayed by their neighbors to become magnetic, according to a new Argonne study.

March 1, 2017
Gary Wiederrecht, group leader and senior nanoscientist at Argonne’s Center for Nanoscale Materials, has received fellowship within the American Physical Society. (Argonne National Laboratory)
Argonne nanoscientist honored as fellow of the American Physical Society

Gary Wiederrecht, a senior nanoscientist at Argonne National Laboratory, has been elected a fellow of the American Physical Society.

November 4, 2016
Maria Curry-Nkansah, chief operations officer of Argonne’s Physical Sciences and Engineering directorate (Image by Wes Agresta/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Argonne’s Curry-Nkansah wins Egretha Award

The Egretha Foundation, which was formed 10 years ago to celebrate the successes of African-American women in the Chicago area, will honor Maria Curry-Nkansah, chief operations officer of the Physical Sciences and Engineering directorate at Argonne National Laboratory, with their annual award on October 21.

October 17, 2016
Argonne Distinguished Fellow Linda Young was awarded the Helmholtz International Fellow Award for her leading work in the field of X-ray science.
Young awarded Helmholtz International Fellow leading up to start of powerful new X-ray laser

Linda Young, Argonne Distinguished Fellow and a leader in the field of X-ray science, has received the Helmholtz International Fellow Award from the Helmholtz Association, the largest scientific organization in Germany.

August 9, 2016
Researchers from Argonne National Laboratory developed a first-principles-based, variable-charge force field that has shown to accurately predict bulk and nanoscale structural and thermodynamic properties of IrO2. Catalytic properties pertaining to the oxygen reduction reaction, which drives water-splitting for the production of hydrogen fuel, were found to depend on the coordination and charge transfer at the IrO2 nanocluster surface. (Image courtesy of Maria Chan, Argonne National Laboratory)
More accurate predictions for harvesting hydrogen with iridium oxide nanoparticles

Researchers from Argonne National Laboratory developed a first-principles-based, variable-charge force field that has shown to accurately predict bulk and nanoscale structural and thermodynamic properties of IrO2.

May 3, 2016
On the left, a schematic shows the experimental setup for measuring spin dynamics in a sample of YIG. On the right, a Brillouin light scattering map of a micro-sized bar of YIG excited via an electrical current through a platinum overlayer reveals a strong spin-wave localization in the center of the sample known as a “bullet.” The color red indicates a high-spin wave intensity and the color blue indicates an absence of spin waves. (Image provided by M. Benjamin Jungfleisch)
Could the future of low-power computing be magnetism?

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Argonne National Laboratory have made two recent advances in the field of spin-wave logic, or the potential use of magnetic spins to transmit and manipulate data.

February 15, 2016
Mercouri Kanatzidis is a senior scientist at Argonne. His work focuses on thermoelectrics, photovoltaics and intermetallics and in designing new materials to develop superconductors. (Click image to view larger.)
Argonne scientist receives American Physical Society award

The American Physical Society awarded chemist Mercouri Kanatzidis the 2016 James C. McGroddy prize for New Materials.

November 23, 2015
Researchers at Argonne’s Center for Nanoscale Materials have confirmed the growth of self-directed graphene nanoribbons on the surface of the semiconducting material germanium by researchers at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. (Click on image to enlarge.)
One Direction: Researchers grow nanocircuitry with semiconducting graphene nanoribbons

Researchers from the University of Wisconsin at Madison are the first to grow self-directed graphene nanoribbons on the surface of the semiconducting material germanium. This allows the semiconducting industry to tailor specific paths for nanocircuitry in their technologies. The findings were confirmed at Argonne’s Center for Nanoscale Materials.

October 13, 2015
Image credit: R&D 100 Awards/R&D Magazine
Six Argonne entries named finalists for R&D 100 Awards

Six entries from the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory have been named finalists for the 2015 edition of the R&D 100 Awards.

July 23, 2015
Three pairs of diffuse magnetic x-ray scattering intensities arising from three short-range zigzag states (illustrated at the center) in a honeycomb lattice iridate Na2IrO3. Distinct magnetic anisotropy of each state manifests bond-directional interactions that lead to a strong magnetic frustration. (Click image to enlarge.)
Argonne X-rays validate quantum magnetism model

Scientists at Argonne and Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research in Stuttgart, Germany have validated a theorized model of quantum magnetism by observing it firsthand in a honeycomb lattice.

May 20, 2015