Argonne National Laboratory

Science Highlights

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This shows particle trajectories in the HELIcal Orbit Spectrometer (HELIOS) after a nuclear reaction took place in the target. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Short-lived isomeric beams to study atomic nuclei

New research from Argonne physicists sets the basis for using transfer reactions on high-spin isomeric beams in order to probe otherwise inaccessible aspects of nuclear structure.

April 10, 2018
In nature, communities of microorganisms have been refining and improving the way in which they conduct biochemical transformations for billions of years. Argonne researchers recently uncovered a new way to map how communities of organisms are organized at a fundamental level to enable this biochemical research and development. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Minimizing complexity in the microbial world

In a recent study published by Frontiers in Microbiology, researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory describe a new way to map how communities of organisms are organized at a fundamental level to tap into nature’s biochemical “research and development.”

February 14, 2018
Submerged SNO in the presence of electric bias undergoes a phase change by intercalating protons in the lattice structure.
Sense like a shark: Saltwater-submersible nickelate film

Argonne researchers have developed a new sensor technology that detects minute changes in electromagnetic fields in much the same way sharks sense their prey.

January 24, 2018
Depiction of the peptide amphiphile, PA (A) and the zinc porphyrin, ZnP (B, shown as both sticks and spheres) that comprise the doped nanofibers. Sheets are shown for high doping ratios of ZnP:PA (C,E,G) and low doping ratios (D,F,H). C and D highlight the relative ZnP packing and E and F illustrate the variation in ZnP spacing. G and H highlight the fiber cross sections.
A new infrastructure: Moving energy on peptide nanofibers

This study links a controllable parameter to improved light-harvesting capabilities.

January 24, 2018
Schematic of SAXS setup showing degree of monodispersity with a TEM image of 360 nm particle suspension (lower right).
Shear thickening ordering behavior is unraveled

This study resolves a long-standing mystery as to why certain shear thickening fluids have an order-to-disorder transition while others do not, and explains the two different mechanisms responsible for this behavior.

January 24, 2018
Argonne researchers and their collaborators have brought lithium sulfur batteries closer to reality by creating a new cathode material made of graphene-wrapped lithium sulfide. [Image credit: <em>Nature Energy</em>, Volume 2, 17090 (2017)]
Graphene unlocks the promise of lithium sulfur batteries

To bring lithium sulfur batteries closer to reality, researchers have developed a new cathode material made out of lithium sulfide encapsulated by graphene.

December 15, 2017
This shows the leading-twist model-independent extraction of the imaginary part of the <sup style="vertical-align: top; position: relative; top: -0.15em;">4</sup>He Compton form factor containing <sup style="vertical-align: top; position: relative; top: -0.15em;">4</sup>He GPD information. The full red curve is a calculation based on a convolution model. The black-dashed curve is a calculation from the same model using different GPDs for the nucleons. The blue long-dashed curve is from an off-shell model. (Image courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and collaborating institutions.)
First exclusive measurement of deeply virtual Compton scattering off Helium-4: Toward the 3-D tomography of nuclei

A new study, co-led by Argonne, in Physical Review Letters discusses how researchers measured beam-spin asymmetry in coherent deeply virtual Compton scattering off a nucleus for the first time.

November 30, 2017
A new study, co-led by Argonne, shows that effects on the energies of excitation in nuclei can depend on how tightly the last neutron or proton is bound. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Effect of weak binding on the apparent spin-orbit splitting in nuclei

A new study in Physical Review Letters, co-led by Argonne, shows that effects on the energies of excitation in nuclei can depend on how tightly the last neutron or proton is bound.

November 30, 2017
Alexander Zholents is director of Argonne’s Accelerator Systems Division (ASD).  A Senior Scientist of the Russian Academy of Sciences and Fellow of the American Physical Society, Zholents was chosen as one of Argonne’s Distinguished Fellows because of his “outstanding technical leadership of major, complex, high-priority projects.”
(Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Argonne appoints Distinguished Fellows for 2017

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory has chosen scientists Alexander Zholents, David Tiede, Wai-Kwong Kwok and Tijana Rajh as Distinguished Fellows, the laboratory’s highest scientific and engineering rank.

May 25, 2017
New research led by Juan de Pablo, the Liew Family Professor at the Institute for Molecular Engineering, uncovers previously unknown features that develop from the interface between air and certain widely studied liquid crystals. The University of Chicago team used Advanced Photon Source X-rays and Argonne’s high performance computing cluster to produce large-scale simulations in order to reconstruct the molecular details. (Image by Juan J. de Pablo.)
Research reveals inner workings of liquid crystals

Liquid crystals are used in everything from tiny digital watches to huge television screens, from optical devices to biomedical detectors.

March 22, 2017