Argonne National Laboratory

Science Highlights

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A surfactant template guides the self-assembly of functional polymer structures in an aqueous solution. Image credit: Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Dept. of Energy; image by Youngkyu Han and Renee Manning. Click to view larger.
‘Greener’ way to assemble materials for solar applications

Polymers used in solar cells today require solvents that can harm the environment, but scientists using the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne have found a “greener” way to control the assembly of photovoltaic polymers in water using a surfactant— a detergent-like molecule—as a template.

October 8, 2015
Researchers have measured how the atoms within electrically insulating solids reorient due to an applied electric field. Shown here for Na1/2Bi1/2TiO3, bismuth ions (purple) align along the electric field direction relative to their surrounding titanium ions (blue). Oxygen ions not shown. (Click image to enlarge.)
Researchers measure how specific atoms move in dielectric materials

This article was originally published by North Caroliina State University.

October 5, 2015
Schematic illustration of an entropy stabilized oxide at the atomic scale. The grey spheres represent the oxygen sub lattice in the rock salt-structured crystal while the colored spheres represent the metal cations. Each different color corresponds to different elemental species. Note that different metals are distributed randomly. Image credit: Jon-Paul Maria. (Click image to enlarge.)
Researchers create first entropy-stabilized complex oxide alloys

Researchers from North Carolina State University, using the Advanced Photon Source, have created the first entropy-stabilized alloy that incorporates oxides – and demonstrated conclusively that the crystalline structure of the material can be determined by disorder at the atomic scale rather than chemical bonding.

September 29, 2015
The image shows staining and quantification of IgA-bound bacteria in the small intestine and colon from healthy humans, while the graph on the right shows the decrease in the fraction of IgA-bound bacteria in the colon. (Image courtesy Dion Antonopoulos and Ted Flynn, Argonne National Laboratory; Click to view larger.)
New insights into regulating the gut’s microbial community

In a study published in the journal Immunity, researchers at Argonne and the University of Chicago have gained new insight into the role the antibody IgA plays in regulating the gut’s microbial community.

August 27, 2015
Image credit: R&D 100 Awards/R&D Magazine
Six Argonne entries named finalists for R&D 100 Awards

Six entries from the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory have been named finalists for the 2015 edition of the R&D 100 Awards.

July 23, 2015
Ali Erdemir has dedicated nearly his entire career to reducing the friction between moving parts, an effort that recently culminated in his receipt of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers’ Mayo D. Hersey Award “in recognition of distinguished and continued contribution over a substantial period of time to the advancement of lubrication science and engineering.”
Tribology researcher recognized for distinguished career

Ali Erdemir has dedicated nearly his entire career to reducing the friction between moving parts, an effort that recently culminated in his receipt of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers’ Mayo D. Hersey Award “in recognition of distinguished and continued contribution over a substantial period of time to the advancement of lubrication science and engineering.”

June 9, 2015
New optics technology opens door to high-resolution atomic-level hard X-ray studies

An international collaboration involving two U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories has demonstrated a way to reach dramatically smaller focal sizes for hard X-rays, opening the door to research with hard X-rays at atomic-scale.

June 8, 2015
Argonne Associate Laboratory Director Mark Peters was honored this week as a Fellow of the American Nuclear Society. (Click image to view larger.)
Mark Peters named an ANS Fellow

Associate Laboratory Director Mark Peters was honored this week as a Fellow of the American Nuclear Society. Fellow is the highest member status presented by the society, and is granted for outstanding accomplishments in the areas of nuclear science and technology.

June 3, 2015
Three pairs of diffuse magnetic x-ray scattering intensities arising from three short-range zigzag states (illustrated at the center) in a honeycomb lattice iridate Na2IrO3. Distinct magnetic anisotropy of each state manifests bond-directional interactions that lead to a strong magnetic frustration. (Click image to enlarge.)
Argonne X-rays validate quantum magnetism model

Scientists at Argonne and Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research in Stuttgart, Germany have validated a theorized model of quantum magnetism by observing it firsthand in a honeycomb lattice.

May 20, 2015
Argonne workshop to explore innovative ways to encourage water conservation

Experts in water conservation, efficiency and behavioral sciences will be gathering later this month at Argonne to address how behavior-changing technologies can play a role in addressing projected shortfalls in water supply.

April 15, 2015