Science Highlights

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Kawtar Hafidi facilitated an American Physical Society Committee on the Status of Women in Physics visit to Argonne, and she initiated the laboratory’s Strategic Hiring, Advancement and Retention Program.
Physicist honored with Argonne’s 2013 WIST Diversity Award

Physicist Kawtar Hafidi is the recipient of Argonne’s 2013 Women in Science and Technology Diversity Award. The annual award acknowledges employees who have demonstrated extraordinary commitment to diversity in an inclusive workplace.

January 28, 2014
Middle-school students compete to build and race cars at the Argonne-hosted Science Bowl.
Area middle schools place in Argonne's Science Bowl

Teams of sixth, seventh and eighth graders engaged in a match of wits and speed by answering tough science and engineering questions in the recent Middle School Science Bowl competition held at Argonne National Laboratory on February 7th and 8th, 2014.

February 19, 2014
 Argonne physicist Kawtar Hafidi speaks to the students. “It’s a great opportunity to encourage and help prepare young women in the field of physics,” Hafidi said. Click to enlarge.
Argonne hosts next generation of female physicists

Eighty-five undergraduate women in the physics field toured Argonne National Laboratory on January 17 as part of the 2014 Midwest Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics.

February 24, 2014
Major heat contributors americium (Am) and curium (Cm) are separated out using the water-soluble molecule DTPA, which attracts the two elements. The family of lanthanides (Ln) comprises 15 rare earth elements considered waste in a closed nuclear fuel cycle. These are separated out with the acidic extractant (HEH[EHP]). Once separated, americium and curium can be reused in advanced nuclear reactors. Click to enlarge. Image credit: Artem V. Gelis
Universal method makes used nuclear fuel reprocessing cooler and safer

A technique developed by scientists at Argonne and Pacific Northwest National laboratory separates the most radioactive elements of used nuclear fuel in one step.

March 13, 2014
Researchers have identified a new way to synthesize inexpensive, transition metal-based catalysts as an alternative to platinum. These new catalysts offer the promise of substantially reducing the fuel cell cost. Click to enlarge.
Finding a suitable platinum substitute for fuel cells

In a new study led by Argonne National Laboratory chemist Di-Jia Liu, researchers have identified a new way to synthesize inexpensive, transition metal-based catalysts as an alternative to platinum. These new catalysts offer the promise of substantially reducing the fuel cell cost.

April 2, 2014