Argonne National Laboratory

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These are surface SEM images of Janus membrane front faces grown with 150, 200 and 300 cycles at .015, .06 and .15 second exposures. A general trend of quicker nucleation and following onset of conformal growth is observed at higher exposure doses and more cycles. This electron microscope image was taken on Carl Zeiss Merlin SEM at the University of Chicago. (Image courtesy of the University of Chicago.)
Two faces offer limitless possibilities

Named for the mythical god with two faces, Janus membranes — double-sided membranes that serve as gatekeepers between two substances — have emerged as a material with potential industrial uses.

July 19, 2018
Anirudha “Ani” Sumant is a nanoscientist at Argonne’s Center for Nanoscale Materials. He received the 2018 TechConnect Innovation Award for his work on nitrogen-incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamonds for application as a portable electron source in field emission cathodes. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Argonne’s TechConnect hat trick

Argonne National Laboratory nanoscientist Anirudha Sumant has earned a TechConnect Innovation Award for the third year in a row. The award recognizes Sumant’s work on nitrogen-incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamonds for application as a portable electron source in field emission cathodes. The technology was developed in partnership with Euclid Techlabs to create a superior field emission electron source for use in linear accelerators.

May 16, 2018
John Carlisle, director of Chain Reaction Innovations (CRI) at Argonne, is seen here introducing the opening of the second CRI cohort pitch on February 7. Six innovators were chosen from that competition and will work to grow their technologies at Argonne over the next two years. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Argonne selects innovators from across nation to grow startups

Argonne announces second cohort of Chain Reaction Innovations.

April 18, 2018
This shows the reaction mechanism for converting hydrogen fluoride (HF) impurity from the electrolyte into lithium fluoride (LiF) in the solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) with release of hydrogen gas (H<sub>2</sub>). The SEI layer is shown on a substrate of gold (Au) atoms, which serves as a simplified model system. Scientists determined this mechanism using advanced computational methods (density functional theory and molecular dynamics simulations). (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Battery’s hidden layer revealed

An international team led by Argonne National Laboratory makes breakthrough in understanding the chemistry of the microscopically thin layer that forms between the liquid electrolyte and solid electrode in lithium-ion batteries. The results are being used in improving the layer and better predicting battery lifetime.

April 17, 2018
Argonne scientists and their collaborators have used a new and counterintuitive approach to balance three important factors — activity, stability and conductivity — in a new catalyst designed for splitting water. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
A catalytic balancing act

Scientists have recently used a new and counterintuitive approach to create a better catalyst that supports one of the reactions involved in splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen. By first creating an alloy of two of the densest naturally occurring elements and then removing one, the scientists reshaped the remaining material’s structure so that it better balanced three important factors: activity, stability and conductivity.

December 21, 2017
By heating the anode material to a much lower temperature (less than 260°C), scientists could remove the water near the surface, but retain the water in the bulk of the material, which enhanced its characteristics. Credit: <em>Nature Communications</em> and study authors. Licensed <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode"><em>here</em></a>. Image was resized.
The wet road to fast and stable batteries

An international team of scientists —– including several researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory — – has discovered an anode battery material with superfast charging and stable operation over many thousands of cycles.

December 12, 2017
Entrepreneur John Carlisle has been named the director of Argonne’s Chain Reaction Innovations program. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Successful startup founder to lead entrepreneurship program at Argonne

John Carlisle has been named the director of Chain Reaction Innovations (CRI), a program aimed at accelerating job creation through innovation, based at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory.

December 4, 2017
Baris Key, assistant chemist (left) and Hao Wang, postdoctoral researcher (right) prepare an experiment in Argonne’s Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) laboratory. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
“Holy Grail” for batteries: Solid-state magnesium battery a big step closer

A team of Department of Energy (DOE) scientists at the Joint Center for Energy Storage Research (JCESR) has discovered the fastest magnesium-ion solid-state conductor, a major step towards making solid-state magnesium-ion batteries that are both energy dense and safe.

November 28, 2017
Argonne won several R&D 100 Awards for its reusable Oleo Sponge, which can clean up oil spills from water and absorb up to 90 times its own weight in oil. Argonne researchers who helped develop the Oleo Sponge include Jeff Elam, Ed Barry, Seth Darling, Jason Avila, Anil Mane and Joe Libera (from left to right). (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Argonne scientists capture several R&D 100 Awards

Innovative technologies developed by researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory recently earned several R&D 100 Awards.

November 21, 2017
Argonne has been recognized in the annual HPCwire Readers’ and Editors’ Choice Awards for its efforts to develop and use deep learning tools to accelerate cancer research. Here, Rick Stevens, Argonne associate laboratory director and principal investigator of the CANDLE project (left) accepts the award from HPCwire CEO Tom Tabor (right). (Image courtesy of Jeremy Thomas/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.)
CANDLE shines in 2017 HPCwire Readers’ and Editors’ Choice Awards

Argonne National Laboratory has been recognized in the annual HPCwire Readers’ and Editors’ Choice Awards, presented at the 2017 International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage and Analysis (SC17), in Denver, Colorado.

November 13, 2017