Chemical sciences & engineering

Finding a suitable platinum substitute for fuel cellsApril 2, 2014

In a new study led by Argonne National Laboratory chemist Di-Jia Liu, researchers have identified a new way to synthesize inexpensive, transition metal-based catalysts as an alternative to platinum. These new catalysts offer the promise of substantially reducing the fuel cell cost.

A new material for solar panels could make them cheaper, more efficientDecember 11, 2013

A unique solar panel design made with a new ceramic material points the way to potentially providing sustainable power cheaper, more efficiently, and requiring less manufacturing time. It also reaches a four-decade-old goal of discovering a bulk photovoltaic material that can harness energy from visible and infrared light, not just ultraviolet light.

Containment Unidirectional Resource Loading System (CURLS)

Glovebox "tunnel" that allows easy, rapid changeover of resources without losing containment

Three Argonne projects win DOE funding to improve vehicle technologiesSeptember 12, 2013

Argonne has received $4.7 million from the DOE for three projects to develop new vehicle technologies, including capacitors, electrochemical couples and electrolytes for batteries intended for hybrid and electric vehicles.

Researchers hope better catalysts lead to better ways of converting biomass to fuelAugust 7, 2013

Scientists and entrepreneurs of old spent millennia trying to transmute lead into gold. Today, a new and more intellectually rigorous kind of alchemy has begun to produce important benefits for an economy that still relies heavily on fossil fuels.

Argonne Now Magazine - Summer 2013

Summer 2013 issue of the biannual Argonne Now science magazine, featuring cover stories "How Your Smartphone Got So Smart," "The Grid of the Future," and "A True Sense of Security" as well as science news, haiku, history, and more.

Scientists combine X-rays and microscopes for precise experimentsJune 13, 2013

By pairing the capabilities of X-ray analysis and extremely precise microscopy, scientists at Argonne have developed a way to simultaneously determine the physical structure and chemical makeup of materials at close to the atomic level.

Discovery of new material state counterintuitive to laws of physicsJune 11, 2013

When you squeeze something, it gets smaller. Unless you’re at Argonne National Laboratory. At the suburban Chicago laboratory, a group of scientists has seemingly defied the laws of physics and found a way to apply pressure to make a material expand instead of compress/contract.