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Research Highlight | Center for Nanoscale Materials

Revealing the intrinsic nature of quantum transitions in non-classical photon sources

In a study published in Nano Letters, researchers present an approach for disentangling the effects of dipole degeneracy and electric field renormalization on emission anisotropy.

Scientific Achievement

We show how polarized single photon emission from semiconductor nanoplatelets can be achieved despite their 2D isotropic emission dipoles.

Significance and Impact

This work will further enable quantum optics and quantum network opportunities utilizing nanoscale single photon emitters by manipulating their emission polarization and directionality.

Research Details

  • Absorption and emission dipoles of core/shell CdSe/CdS semiconductor nanoplatelets were studied using single particle spectroscopy at the Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM).
  • The study employed the quantum entanglement microscope and dry etching capabilities at the CNM.

DOIhttps://​doi​.org/​10.1021/acs.nanolett.8b00347

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Work was performed in part at the Center for Nanoscale Materials.

(a) Geometry-dependent polarization anisotropy. (b) Electric field distributions show the likelihood of optical transitions for light polarized along the short axis (left) is lower than along the long axis (right).

About Argonne’s Center for Nanoscale Materials
The Center for Nanoscale Materials at Argonne National Laboratory is one of the five U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs), premier national user facilities for interdisciplinary research at the nanoscale, supported by the DOE Office of Science. Together, the NSRCs comprise a suite of complementary facilities that provide researchers with state-of-the-art capabilities to fabricate, process, characterize and model nanoscale materials, and constitute the largest infrastructure investment of the National Nanotechnology Initiative.

Argonne National Laboratory seeks solutions to pressing national problems in science and technology. The nation’s first national laboratory, Argonne conducts leading-edge basic and applied scientific research in virtually every scientific discipline. Argonne researchers work closely with researchers from hundreds of companies, universities, and federal, state and municipal agencies to help them solve their specific problems, advance America’s scientific leadership and prepare the nation for a better future. With employees from more than 60 nations, Argonne is managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science.

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