Argonne National Laboratory

Press Releases

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John Bahns, Subramanian Sankaranarayanan, Liaohai Chen and Stephen Gray find new way to assemble nanoparticles.
Scientists use light to join nanoparticles into new materials

For many years, scientists have searched for ways to assemble nanoparticles—tiny bits of matter less than a millionth of an inch across—into larger structures of any desired shape and form at will. This effect has been achieved in a new study by using a laser as if it were a magic wand, creating an assembled, continuous filament as the laser beam is moved around.

March 14, 2011
Four Argonne National Laboratory scientists receive Early Career Research Program awards

Four researchers at Argonne have received 2012 Early Career Research Program awards, granted to exceptional researchers beginning their careers.

May 10, 2012
Jeff Elam (left) and Anil Mane’s work in nanocomposite charge drain coatings represents a significant breakthrough in Argonne's efforts to develop microelectromechanical systems, or MEMS. To view a larger version of the image, click on it.
Argonne claims four 2013 R&D 100 Awards

Four innovative technologies have won 2013 R&D 100 Awards, regarded as the “Oscars of invention,” for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory.

July 8, 2013
Argonne materials scientists Seungbum Hong (left) and Andreas Roelofs adjust an atomic force microscope.
Click to enlarge. Photo credit: Wes Agresta/Argonne National Laboratory.
Microscopy charges ahead

In order to see the true polarization states of ferroelectric materials quickly and efficiently, researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory have developed a new technique called charge gradient microscopy.

May 28, 2014
A new study by Argonne and Northwestern scientists reported that solar panels manufactured in China are likely to use more energy to make and have a larger carbon footprint than those made in Europe. Image by Renee Carlson / Argonne National Laboratory. Click to enlarge.
Solar panel manufacturing is greener in Europe than China, study says

Solar panels made in China have a higher overall carbon footprint and are likely to use substantially more energy during manufacturing than those made in Europe, said a new study from Northwestern University and Argonne.

May 29, 2014
University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point chemistry professor Michael Zach (left) and Argonne nanoscientist Ani Sumant pose with their R&D 100 award-winning “NanoFab lab…in a box!” Click to enlarge. Photo credit: Mark Lopez.
Argonne wins three R&D 100 awards

Argonne wins three 2014 R&D 100 awards.

July 11, 2014
A false-color image of a microelectromechanical device. The diamond-based actuator is colored gold. Click to enlarge. Image credit: Ani Sumant.
Thin diamond films provide new material for micro-machines

Researchers at the Center for Nanoscale Materials at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory and a handful of other institutions around the world have directed their focus to exploring microelectromechanical systems made of a relatively new material known as ultrananocrystalline diamond, which is a smooth and wear-resistant diamond thin film.

July 31, 2014
Techniques at Argonne’s Electron Microscopy Center helped scientists get a complete picture of this chemical reaction. Over the course of the reaction, the nanorod on the top left is slowly covered with a growth of copper deposits from the solution. Maps showed the locations of the elements in the reaction: Ag, or yellow, representing silver; blue representing gold, Au; and Cu, copper, shown in red. Images courtesy Nestor Zaluzec / Argonne National Laboratory Electron Microscopy Center. Click image to enlarge.
Electron microscopes take first measurements of nanoscale chemistry in action

Scientists’ underwater cameras got a boost this summer from the Electron Microscopy Center at Argonne National Laboratory. Along with colleagues at the University of Manchester, researchers captured the world’s first real-time images and simultaneous chemical analysis of nanostructures while “underwater,” or in solution.

September 3, 2014
Graphene's hexagonal structure makes it an excellent lubricant. (Click image to enlarge)
Researchers fight friction and wear with one-atom-thick graphene

Nanoscientist Anirudha Sumant and his colleagues at Argonne’s Center for Nanoscale Materials and Argonne’s Energy Systems division applied a one-atom-thick layer of graphene, a two-dimensional form of carbon, in between a steel ball and a steel disk. They found that just the single layer of graphene lasted for more than 6,500 “wear cycles,” a dramatic improvement over conventional lubricants like graphite or molybdenum disulfide.

October 13, 2014
The surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor detects frequency changes in waves that propagate through its crystalline structure. This makes it ideal for detecting the presence of chemicals or biomarkers present in a liquid or gas. For example, it can detect cancer proteins attached to a receptor on the sensor surface. Image credit: Shutterstock. (Click image to enlarge)
Researchers develop new acoustic sensor for chemical and biological detection

A new microscopic acoustic device that has been dramatically improved by scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory has the potential to form a new test for ovarian cancer or the presence of a particular chemical.

November 17, 2014