Argonne National Laboratory

Feature Stories

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Here are pickled electrolyte molecules (PF<sub>2</sub>OSiMe<sub>3</sub>) binding to reaction centers on the cathode surface. For the ball-and-stick molecules attached to cathode surface, olive green indicates phosphorus (P); purple, fluorine (F); red, oxygen (O); and structure above oxygen, SiMe<sub>3</sub>. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory / Juan C. Garcia.)
The science behind pickled battery electrolytes

Argonne material scientists have discovered a reaction that helps explain the behavior of a key electrolyte additive used to boost battery performance.

June 15, 2018
Argonne chemists Ted Krause and Max Delferro (pictured) focus much of their work on single-site catalysts because of the promise they show for both high activity and product selectivity. Their work has led to several U.S. patent applications. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Cracking the catalytic code

In a variety of research programs, Argonne experts are finding ways to make cheaper and more efficient the manufacture of products derived from shale gas deposits and identifying new routes to higher-performance.

April 24, 2018
Oleo Sponge picks up oil during tests at Argonne. (Image by Mark Lopez/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Nine ways Argonne advanced science and technology in 2017

As 2018 approaches, Argonne looks back at nine cool stories that came out of research projects and collaborations at the laboratory.

December 21, 2017
Researchers at Argonne and other national laboratories are seeking to identify and fill gaps hindering the commercialization of extreme fast charging for plug-in electric vehicles. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Vehicle Technologies Office recently announced its commitment to this goal via a $15 million funding opportunity. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Closing the gap: Argonne, partners putting charge into EV battery technology

Widespread demand for electric vehicles could hinge on batteries that can be charged in minutes instead of hours, and researchers at the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory are

November 7, 2017
In high school, Tavis Reed earned an ACT-SO gold medal for devising a technique, now patent pending, that efficiently produces ethanol. Reed has explored a wide range of research fields, from microbes to batteries, via Argonne’s Student Research Participation Program. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Stairway to science

The ACT-SO program launches high school student on path to Argonne’s student research program, a provisional patent and the pursuit of degree at Washington University in St. Louis.

October 2, 2017
A new material developed at Argonne shows promise for batteries that store electricity for the grid. The material consists of carefully structured molecules designed to be particularly electrochemically stable in order to prevent the battery from losing energy to unwanted reactions. (Image by Robert Horn, Argonne National Laboratory.)
New battery material goes with the flow

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory have engineered a new material to be used in redox flow batteries, which are particularly useful for storing electricity for the grid. The material consists of carefully structured molecules designed to be particularly electrochemically stable in order to prevent the battery from losing energy to unwanted reactions.

August 11, 2017
The world is dotted with research reactors that run on highly enriched uranium. For nearly four decades, scientists and engineers at Argonne National Laboratory have been leading the global effort to convert such reactors to run on low-enriched uranium instead.
Into Kazakhstan to Convert a Reactor

The world is dotted with research reactors that run on highly enriched uranium. Argonne engineers are traveling the world to convert them one by one.

April 3, 2017
Intricately shaped pulses of light pave a speedway for the accelerated dynamics of quantum particles, enabling faster switching of a quantum bit. (Image by Peter Allen.)
Fast track control accelerates switching of quantum bits

An international collaboration among physicists at the University of Chicago, Argonne National Laboratory, McGill University and the University of Konstanz recently demonstrated a new framework for faster control of a quantum bit—the basic unit of information in yet-to-be created quantum computers—in findings published online Nov. 28 in Nature Physics. Their experiments on a single electron in a diamond chip could create quantum devices less prone to errors when operated at high speeds.

January 12, 2017
Inside an engine is a harsh place: the intense heat and pressure cause the parts to wear away and break down. But this new coating, which rebuilds itself as soon as it begins to break down, could protect engine parts (and more) for much longer.
9 cool science & tech stories from Argonne in 2016

As 2016 draws to a close, we’re looking back at just a few of the many cool stories that came out of research conducted by Argonne scientists and engineers this year. These discoveries are just a tiny sample of how Argonne researchers help address energy challenges, boost the economy through new discoveries and technologies, and expand scientific knowledge.

December 22, 2016
Hydrogen fuel cells, like the one shown above, could provide many advantages and pathways for cleaner energy use. (science photo/Shutterstock)
Six things you might not know about hydrogen

October 8th is National Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Day. To celebrate, here are a few things you might not know about hydrogen and fuel cells.

October 7, 2016