Argonne National Laboratory

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This shows electron microscopy of cross-linked titania nanoparticles with boron-based clusters. Argonne researchers helped create a method to build these networks. (Image courtesy of UCLA / Alexander Spokoyny.)
What a mesh

A team of scientists from across the U.S. has found a new way to create molecular interconnections that can give a certain class of materials exciting new properties, including improving their ability to catalyze chemical reactions or harvest energy from light.

March 29, 2018
Argonne researchers helped identify the process by which holes get trapped in nanoparticles made of zinc oxide, a material of potential interest for solar applications because it absorbs ultraviolet light. (Image by Christopher Milne.)
It’s a trap!

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory have published a new study that identifies the process by which holes get trapped in nanoparticles made of zinc oxide, a material of potential interest for solar applications because it absorbs ultraviolet light.

March 27, 2018
Researchers from Argonne and the University of California at Santa Barbara have identified another elemental actor that helps activate palladium while reducing the amount of the precious metal needed for reactions to occur. (Image by Shutterstock / clearviewstock.)
Nickel in the X-ray limelight

Argonne scientists and collaborators have identified another elemental actor in catalytic reactions that helps activate palladium while reducing the amount of the precious metal needed for those reactions to occur.

March 26, 2018
In a new study, Argonne and University of Lille chemists explored protactinium’s multiple resemblances to more completely understand the relationship between the transition metals and the complex chemistry of the early actinide elements. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory and Shutterstock / Humdan.)
The element of surprise

In a new study from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Lille in France, chemists have explored protactinium’s multiple resemblances to more completely understand the relationship between the transition metals and the complex chemistry of the early actinide elements.

March 14, 2018
Nitrogen oxides are significant pollutants to the atmosphere. Argonne chemist Stephen Klippenstein co-authored a new review paper that compiled decades of data to create a model of how these pollutants are produced. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory. Home page banner image courtesy of Shutterstock / Natalya Erofeeva.)
Painting a clear picture of how nitrogen oxides are formed

For decades, combustion researchers and engine companies have been seeking to understand how these gases are produced during combustion so that they can find ways to reduce them. Now Argonne researchers have synthesized more than a decade’s worth of combustion studies to create a new overarching model of how nitrogen oxides are produced.

March 9, 2018
A research team led by Argonne’s Giulia Galli has gleaned new insights about the structure of salt water by simulating the liquid at the molecular level with the Mira supercomputer, housed at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility. (Image courtesy of Giulia Galli and Alex Gaiduk/Institute for Molecular Engineering.)
Study of salts in water causing stir

A pair of Argonne scientists uncover fresh insights about the structure of saltwater.

February 1, 2018
Argonne researchers have gotten a better look at how the molecular structures of organic solar cells form, which provides new insights that can improve their efficiency. (Image courtesy of Shutterstock / Dave Weaver.)
Going organic

Using Argonne’s Advanced Photon Source, researchers analyzed how organic solar cells’ crystal structures develop as they are produced under different conditions. With the APS, researchers learned how certain additives affect the microstructures obtained, providing new insights that can improve the cells’ efficiency.

January 9, 2018
A research team that included Argonne chemist Stephen Klippenstein examined the production of hydroxyl radicals, which help break down air pollutants, in a new light. (Credit: Shutterstock / chuyuss)
Clearing the air

A greater understanding of the dynamics of chemical reactions is leading to better models of atmospheric chemistry. Through this work, scientists are gaining insight into a key chemical able to break down some major air pollutants.

December 13, 2017
By heating the anode material to a much lower temperature (less than 260°C), scientists could remove the water near the surface, but retain the water in the bulk of the material, which enhanced its characteristics. Credit: <em>Nature Communications</em> and study authors. Licensed <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode"><em>here</em></a>. Image was resized.
The wet road to fast and stable batteries

An international team of scientists —– including several researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory — – has discovered an anode battery material with superfast charging and stable operation over many thousands of cycles.

December 12, 2017
A <em>Nature</em> study describes how Argonne and collaborating institutions helped develop a new way of converting methane to methanol using rhodium-based catalysts. (Image credit: Shutterstock / Double Brain)
Making fuel out of thick air

In a new study, researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, Tufts University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory teamed up to explore the potential of rhodium-based catalysts for this conversion under milder conditions.

December 7, 2017