Argonne National Laboratory

Feature Stories

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This shows the HACC cosmology simulation, which combines high spatial and temporal resolution in a large cosmological volume. The high temporal resolution tracks the evolution of structures in great detail and correlates formation histories to the environments in which the structures form. (Image courtesy of Silvio Rizzi and Joe Insley/Argonne Leadership Computing Facility/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Cartography of the cosmos

There are hundreds of billions of stars in our own Milky Way galaxy, interspersed with all manner of matter, from the dark to the sublime. This is the universe that Argonne researcher Salman Habib is trying to reconstruct, structure by structure, combining telescope surveys with next-generation data analysis and simulation techniques currently being primed for exascale computing.

September 25, 2017
In these high-speed x-ray images, the 3-D printer is using a laser to melt metal powder, which causes a ‘keyhole’ defect within the cooled material. Researchers at Argonne are studying this process and developing guidelines to avoid such errors. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Argonne efforts accelerate 3-D printing journey

Argonne scientists’ first glimpse inside additive manufacturing process yields important advancements

September 6, 2017
"To take the next step in nanoscience, we need to master reproduction and adaptation. How can we think about making it easier to repair individual units in artificial systems?"
Crowdsource: What will your field of science look like in 50 years?

CROWDSOURCE asks Argonne scientists from different disciplines to each provide a perspective on a complex question. Today we’re asking: What might your field of science look like in 50 years?

April 3, 2017
With the theoretical framework developed at Argonne, researchers can more precisely predict particle interactions such as this simulation of a vector boson plus jet event. (Image by Taylor Childers.)
High-precision calculations on supercomputers help reveal the physics of the universe

Argonne researchers have developed a new theoretical approach, ideally suited for high-performance computing systems, capable of making predictive calculations about particle interactions that conform almost exactly to experimental data. This new approach could give scientists a valuable tool for describing new physics and particles beyond those currently identified.

March 9, 2017
Students from Stony Brook University visited Argonne with research professor Nils Feege to test a prototype of a magnetic cloak — a crucial piece of equipment for a next-generation particle collider — at Argonne’s 4-Tesla Magnet Facility. From left to right: Thomas Krahulik, Nils Feege, Rourke Sekelsky, Joshua LaBounty and Stacy Karthas. (Image by Nils Feege.)
A road trip to test a magnetic cloak at Argonne National Laboratory

In December, five students from Stony Brook University in New York and their research professor loaded a prototype of a magnetic cloak into an SUV and set off for Argonne National Laboratory, nearly 900 miles away.

February 24, 2017
Cooling technique helps researchers “target” a major component for a new collider

Researchers at Argonne have recently developed a new ultra-low-friction sliding contact mechanism that uses chilled water to remove heat from a key component of a next-generation collider.

December 2, 2016
Building project managers and scientific leads confer at the site of a new clean room under construction at Argonne National Laboratory. When completed, the lab will enable scientists and engineers to build extremely sensitive detectors — such as those capable of detecting light from the early days of the universe. (Image by Mark Lopez/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Building a room clean enough to make sensors to find light from the birth of the universe

Work is underway at Argonne on an expansion of its “clean room.” The new lab will be specially suited for building parts for ultra-sensitive detectors — such as those to carry out improved X-ray research, or for the South Pole Telescope to search for light from the early days of the universe.

October 17, 2016
How Things Break (And Why Scientists Want to Know)

Breaking things can help scientists answer both the most elemental and the most everyday questions.

March 28, 2016
"I was interested in mathematics and problem solving from a very early age," said Katrin Heitmann, a computational physicist and computational scientist in Argonne's high energy physics department.
Women in STEM careers: Breaking down barriers

Three Argonne researchers share their experiences, why they pursued STEM careers, and how they’re continuing to help the next generation of scientists and engineers to flourish.

March 7, 2016
This series shows the evolution of the universe as simulated by a run called the Q Continuum, performed on the Titan supercomputer and led by Argonne physicist Katrin Heitmann. These images give an impression of the detail in the matter distribution in the simulation. At first the matter is very uniform, but over time gravity acts on the dark matter, which begins to clump more and more, and in the clumps, galaxies form. Image by Heitmann et. al. (Click to view larger.)
Researchers model birth of universe in one of largest cosmological simulations ever run

Researchers are sifting through an avalanche of data produced by one of the largest cosmological simulations ever performed, led by scientists at Argonne.

October 29, 2015