Argonne National Laboratory

Feature Stories

Date Postedsort ascending
"I was interested in mathematics and problem solving from a very early age," said Katrin Heitmann, a computational physicist and computational scientist in Argonne's high energy physics department.
Women in STEM careers: Breaking down barriers

Three Argonne researchers share their experiences, why they pursued STEM careers, and how they’re continuing to help the next generation of scientists and engineers to flourish.

March 7, 2016
This series shows the evolution of the universe as simulated by a run called the Q Continuum, performed on the Titan supercomputer and led by Argonne physicist Katrin Heitmann. These images give an impression of the detail in the matter distribution in the simulation. At first the matter is very uniform, but over time gravity acts on the dark matter, which begins to clump more and more, and in the clumps, galaxies form. Image by Heitmann et. al. (Click to view larger.)
Researchers model birth of universe in one of largest cosmological simulations ever run

Researchers are sifting through an avalanche of data produced by one of the largest cosmological simulations ever performed, led by scientists at Argonne.

October 29, 2015
Argonne mentors stand beside students from Chicago-area schools. Argonne’s ACT-SO STEM Research and Mentoring Program provides mentors and facilities to help students prepare their research for ACT-SO’s STEM competition. Photo by Justin H.S. Breaux; click to view larger.
Argonne mentors students for the next generation of scientists

On May 6, the accomplishments of seventeen Chicago-area high school students that had been mentored by staff at Argonne National Laboratory were honored for their performance at this year’s Afro-Academic, Cultural, Technological and Scientific Olympics (ACT-SO) competition, held at the College of DuPage in March.

May 28, 2015
At the South Pole Telescope, scientists measure cosmic radiation still traveling across space from the early days of the universe - using superconductors. Image by Daniel Luong-Van, National Science Foundation. Click to enlarge.
Seeing Back in Time with Superconductors

For Argonne physicist Clarence Chang, looking backward in time to the earliest ages of the universe is all in a day’s work.

June 1, 2014
Andrey Elagin (left), postdoctoral scholar at the Enrico Fermi Institute at the University of Chicago, and Matthew Wetstein, the Grainger Postdoctoral Fellow at the Enrico Fermi Institute at the University of Chicago, adjust the optics in the Large Area Picosecond Photodetector testing facility. The facility uses extremely short laser pulses to precisely measure the time resolution of the photodetectors. Click to enlarge.
Collaboration between varied organizations develops larger, more precise photodetectors for the market

Scientific particle detectors, medical imaging devices and cargo scanners with higher resolutions and cheaper price tags could become a reality, thanks to a three-way collaboration between industry, universities and U.S. national laboratories.

November 5, 2013
At the South Pole Telescope, scientists measure cosmic radiation still traveling across space from the early days of the universe. Image by Daniel Luong-Van, National Science Foundation. Click to enlarge.
South Pole Telescope helps Argonne scientists study earliest ages of the universe

For Argonne physicist Clarence Chang, looking backward in time to the earliest ages of the universe is all in a day’s work.

October 28, 2013
Zoomed-in image from the Dark Energy Camera of the center of the globular star cluster 47 Tucanae, which lies about 17,000 light years from Earth. Credit: Dark Energy Survey Collaboration.
Dark energy: Q&A with Steve Kuhlmann

Why do we care about dark energy in the first place?

September 17, 2012
Argonne materials scientist Anil Mane examines a microchannel plate.
Award-winning technology provides a breakthrough in particle physics

High-energy physics, it turns out, is a lot like life – it’s all about the timing.

August 3, 2012
Mayly Sanchez, an Argonne particle physicist, received an Outstanding Technical Achievement Award from HENAAC, the Hispanic Engineer National Achievement Award Corporation.
Particle passion: Argonne physicist honored with HENAAC award

Mayly Sanchez, a particle physicist at Argonne National Laboratory, received an Outstanding Technical Achievement Award from the Hispanic Engineer National Achievement Award Corporation.

October 28, 2009