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Research Highlight | Materials Science Division

Orbital-flop induced magnetoresistance anisotropy

In a study published in Nature Communications, researchers indicated their results showcase a contribution of orbital behavior in the emergence of intriguing phenomena.

Scientific Achievement

Discovery of a new electron orbital contribution to the emergence of intriguing magneto-transport phenomena.

Significance and Impact

This work provides direct evidence of a new type of orbital-induced property in CeSb and its contributions to the phenomenon of extremely large magnetoresistance. It further demonstrates the potential of utilizing orbital-flop transitions in electronic applications via spin-valve-like structures.

Research Details

  • Grew ultra-high quality CeSb single crystals.
  • Measured magnetoresistances in a rotating magnetic field perpendicular to the current.
  • Developed a phenomenological model to account for the anisotropic magnetoresistance.
  • Constructed a spin-valve-like structure to demonstrate the utilization of orbital-flops.

DOI10.1038/s41467-019-10624-z

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