Argonne National Laboratory

Feature Stories

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Scientists have used a new X-ray diffraction technique called Bragg single-angle ptychography to get a clear picture of how planes of atoms shift and squeeze under stress. (Image by Robert Horn/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Single-angle ptychography allows 3D imaging of stressed materials

Scientists have used a new X-ray diffraction technique called Bragg single-angle ptychography to get a clear picture of how planes of atoms shift and squeeze under stress.

March 21, 2017
In 75 steps, Lake Park High School becomes winner of Argonne’s 2017 Rube Goldberg Machine Contest.  The team will participate in the National High School Rube Goldberg Machine Contest Finals held in Columbus, Ohio later this month. (Image by Mark Lopez.)
Lake Park High School wins Argonne’s 2017 Rube Goldberg Machine Challenge

In 75 steps, Lake Park High School won Argonne’s Rube Goldberg Machine Challenge. They now go on to the national competition in Columbus, Ohio.

March 15, 2017
With the theoretical framework developed at Argonne, researchers can more precisely predict particle interactions such as this simulation of a vector boson plus jet event. (Image by Taylor Childers.)
High-precision calculations on supercomputers help reveal the physics of the universe

Argonne researchers have developed a new theoretical approach, ideally suited for high-performance computing systems, capable of making predictive calculations about particle interactions that conform almost exactly to experimental data. This new approach could give scientists a valuable tool for describing new physics and particles beyond those currently identified.

March 9, 2017
Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day (IGED) is a diversity outreach program designed to provide 8th-grade girls an opportunity to learn about science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) careers. Students are assigned to engineer and scientist mentors at Argonne who accompany the girls throughout the day's scheduled activities. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Argonne hosts 15th annual Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day

IGED is a diversity outreach program designed to provide 8th-grade girls an opportunity to learn about science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) careers. Students are assigned to engineer and scientist mentors who accompany the girls throughout the day's scheduled activities.

March 2, 2017
Students from Stony Brook University visited Argonne with research professor Nils Feege to test a prototype of a magnetic cloak — a crucial piece of equipment for a next-generation particle collider — at Argonne’s 4-Tesla Magnet Facility. From left to right: Thomas Krahulik, Nils Feege, Rourke Sekelsky, Joshua LaBounty and Stacy Karthas. (Image by Nils Feege.)
A road trip to test a magnetic cloak at Argonne National Laboratory

In December, five students from Stony Brook University in New York and their research professor loaded a prototype of a magnetic cloak into an SUV and set off for Argonne National Laboratory, nearly 900 miles away.

February 24, 2017
David Lary, an atmospheric scientist at the University of Texas-Dallas, discusses air particulate sensors that are being integrated in the Argonne-developed Waggle platform to measure and monitor air quality in Chattanooga, Tennessee. (Image by Wes Agresta/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Breakthrough wireless sensing system attracts industry and government agency interest

Top experts in environmental sensing explored existing and potential applications for Waggle and other sensing technologies during a two-day workshop held at Argonne last year. From researching deforestation in the Amazon to improving air quality for manned space missions, attendees revealed unique ways to apply sensing technology to improve our understanding of Earth and human health – and a number of these applications employed Waggle.

February 20, 2017
Daniel Wright Jr. High School is the winner of the 2017 DOE Regional Middle School Science Bowl. This makes for the sixth win in seven years for the suburban Chicago school, which will now go on to compete in the National Finals of the DOE National Science Bowl® in Washington D.C. this April. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Middle schoolers test their knowledge at science bowl competition

Ten middle school teams met at Argonne for the 27th annual Department of Energy Regional Science Bowl in February.

February 15, 2017
Students tried their hands at computer coding during “Hour of Code,” a global movement to encourage interest in computer science. Here, Argonne scientist Christopher Peters talks to students at Heritage Grove Middle School. Argonne’s educational programs department arranged for 45 Argonne, Fermilab and UChicago computer scientists to visit 49 different schools across the Chicagoland area. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Hour of Code sends 45 Argonne, Fermilab and UChicago computer scientists to schools

Argonne’s Educational Programs Department coordinated an effort to send computer scientists from Argonne and Fermilab National Laboratory and computer science students from the University of Chicago into schools in the greater Chicago area last December for Hour of Code, a global movement that aims to get everyone, kids to adults, to try computer coding for an hour.

February 3, 2017
Anaerobic bacteria play a central role in cycling carbon and other key elements throughout Earth. A new study shows that the behavior of these microbes is significantly affected by the types of carbon “food” sources available to them. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Study of microbes reveals new insight about Earth’s geology and carbon cycles

Tiny microbes play a big role in cycling carbon and other key elements through our air, water, soil and sediment. Researchers who study these processes at Argonne National Laboratory have discovered that these microbial communities are significantly affected by the types of carbon “food” sources available. Their findings reveal that the type of carbon source affects not only the composition and activity of natural microbial communities, but also in turn the types of mineral products that form in their environment.

January 30, 2017
This manmade peptide, molecular components that link together to from proteins, contains both natural and mirror-image amino acid building blocks. This arrangement, which was modeled using Argonne National Laboratory's Mira supercomputer, gives rise to spirals that twist in opposite directions, a structure not seen in any natural protein. (Image by Vikram K. Mulligan/University of Washington.)
A rising peptide: Supercomputing helps scientists come closer to tailoring drug molecules

With the help of the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility’s Mira supercomputer, scientists have successfully designed and verified stable versions of synthetic peptides, components that join together to form proteins.

January 25, 2017