Argonne National Laboratory

Feature Stories

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University of Minnesota Engineering Professor Joe Nichols is working with the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility to create high-fidelity computer simulations to determine how jet turbulence produces noise. (Image courtesy of University of Minnesota.)
The Sublime Challenge of Jet Noise

Joe Nichols, of the University of Minnesota, is using ALCF resources to create high fidelity simulations of jet turbulence to determine how and where noise is produced. The results may lead to novel engineering designs that reduce noise over commercial flight paths and on aircraft carrier decks.

September 18, 2017
Argonne Neuroscientist  Bobby Kasthuri is using Argonne’s supercomputer to map the intricacies of brain function at the deepest levels. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Small Brain, Big Data

Using a multi-lab approach, Argonne researchers are tapping the laboratory’s vast arsenal of innovative technologies to map the intricacies of brain function at the deepest levels, and describing them in greater detail than ever before through advanced data analysis techniques. The brain connectome project is supported by the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility’s new Data Science Program, a new initiative targeted at big data problems.

September 11, 2017
In these high-speed x-ray images, the 3-D printer is using a laser to melt metal powder, which causes a ‘keyhole’ defect within the cooled material. Researchers at Argonne are studying this process and developing guidelines to avoid such errors. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Argonne efforts accelerate 3-D printing journey

Argonne scientists’ first glimpse inside additive manufacturing process yields important advancements

September 6, 2017
A simulated sky image of galaxies produced by running Argonne-developed high-performance computing codes and then running a galaxy formation model.  Argonne has collaborated with the University of Illinois, teaming up two supercomputers to perform simulation and data analysis of extremely large-scale, computationally intensive models of the universe. (Image by Lindsey Bleem, Nan Li, and the HACC team/Argonne National Laboratory; Mike Gladders/University of Chicago.)
Big Bang – The Movie

In a new approach to enable scientific breakthroughs, researchers linked together supercomputers at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) and at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

August 24, 2017
Students practice new skills taught in the 2017 coding camp. Participants explored how Argonne scientists use computers in diverse disciplines and were introduced to up-to-date programming tools. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Widening horizons for high schoolers with code

In July, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory hosted a five-day Coding Camp for more than two dozen high school juniors and seniors, teaching new programming skills and how computer science is an integral part of an Argonne researcher’s life.

August 23, 2017
Summer intern William Trevillyan explaind his nanoparticle research with fellow intern Savannah Mitchem. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Young minds take the stage at Argonne

Argonne’s Learning on the Lawn celebration capped 10 weeks of intense discoveries and experimentation for 90 students, led by luminaries from across the laboratory – from nuclear engineers to biologists to experts in exascale computing, systems that will be 50+ times quicker than today’s supercomputers.

August 16, 2017
A new material developed at Argonne shows promise for batteries that store electricity for the grid. The material consists of carefully structured molecules designed to be particularly electrochemically stable in order to prevent the battery from losing energy to unwanted reactions. (Image by Robert Horn, Argonne National Laboratory.)
New battery material goes with the flow

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory have engineered a new material to be used in redox flow batteries, which are particularly useful for storing electricity for the grid. The material consists of carefully structured molecules designed to be particularly electrochemically stable in order to prevent the battery from losing energy to unwanted reactions.

August 11, 2017
Chain Reaction Innovation entrepreneurs Justin Whiteley and Tyler Huggins work with Argonne scientist Meltem Urgun-Demirtas in an Energy Systems Division laboratory to grow tunable, high-performance porous carbon from fungi. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Growing a startup with a big impact from a tiny fungi

A startup company working with Argonne’s Chain Reaction Innovations is designing a new form of activated carbon for use in filtration, chemical separation and biogas conditioning.

August 9, 2017
(Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Big Data meets big healthcare for veterans

Veterans will be the ultimate winners in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs-Department of Energy (DOE) Big Data Science Initiative, a collaborative research effort that casts Argonne National Laboratory in a prominent role.

August 7, 2017
Image of the protein tryptophan synthase created using diffraction data from Argonne's Advanced Photon Source. The inhibitor binds between the reaction sites in the protein, represented here by the orange and blue pockets. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
"Monkey wrench" molecule jams tuberculosis protein

Scientists at Argonne National Laboratory were part of a recent discovery of a new molecule that attacks tuberculosis-causing bacteria by cutting off its production of a chemical necessary for its survival.

August 4, 2017