Argonne National Laboratory

Feature Stories

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Water under extreme pressure and temperatures displays odd properties, which were modeled by Argonne and University of Chicago scientists. (Image by University of Chicago / Peter Allen.)
Better model of water under extreme conditions could aid understanding of Earth's mantle

When exposed to unimaginably high temperatures and pressures, water exhibits all sorts of weird phases and properties. Researchers from Argonne and the University of Chicago have developed simulations to predict water’s properties in these harsh conditions.

June 21, 2018
Here are pickled electrolyte molecules (PF<sub>2</sub>OSiMe<sub>3</sub>) binding to reaction centers on the cathode surface. For the ball-and-stick molecules attached to cathode surface, olive green indicates phosphorus (P); purple, fluorine (F); red, oxygen (O); and structure above oxygen, SiMe<sub>3</sub>. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory / Juan C. Garcia.)
The science behind pickled battery electrolytes

Argonne material scientists have discovered a reaction that helps explain the behavior of a key electrolyte additive used to boost battery performance.

June 15, 2018
These four ARE fellows are helping the entrepreneurs within Argonne’s Chain Reaction Innovations program grow businesses and attain research goals. From left to right: Nisarg Patel (helping Atlas Energy Systems), Maxwell Miller (helping ClearFlame Engines, Zach Kaiser (helping Advanced Ionics) and Alec Houpt (helping FGC Plasma Solutions). (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Training the next generation of entrepreneurs

Argonne’s fellows in the Applied Research Experience program have a front-row view of entrepreneurship as they help the laboratory’s Chain Reaction Innovators achieve research goals.

June 13, 2018
In late May, the Chicago chapter of the Association for Women in Science met at Argonne to celebrate the group’s 40th anniversary. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Celebrating 40 years of empowerment in science

Four decades ago, an ambitious group of women scientists at Argonne banded together to help form a group that would empower generations of women to come. In late May, they celebrated the 40th anniversary of that group, the Chicago Area Chapter of the Association for Women in Science (AWIS).

June 7, 2018
Argonne researchers are modeling and simulating how connected and autonomous vehicles could affect energy and mobility in metropolitan areas. (Image by Shutterstock / metamorworks.)
Demystifying the future of connected and autonomous vehicles

Argonne researchers are deploying advanced modeling and simulation tools to predict the impact of CAVs on energy and mobility in metropolitan areas. Their work, part of a collaborative three-year project, supports DOE’s SMART (Systems and Modeling for Accelerated Research in Transportation) Mobility Consortium.

June 1, 2018
Three-dimensional view of a magnitude 7.9 earthquake on the Southern San Andreas Fault from an RSQSim simulation. Colors indicate elements that slipped in the earthquake, brighter colors show areas of higher slip. Faults that did not participate in this event are shown in gray. This simulated event is similar in size and location to the 1857 Fort Tejon Earthquake. (Image by University of Southern California / Kevin Milner.)
Shake rattle and code

Tom Jordan and a team from the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) are using the supercomputing resources of the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF), a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science User Facility, to advance modeling for the study of earthquake risk and how to reduce it.

May 1, 2018
Researcher Kevin Beyer explained the nuances of Argonne’s Advanced Photon Source to two Aqsa students. Along with 14 other schools, the Aqsa students took part in Argonne’s Exemplary Student Research Program in February. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Argonne’s Exemplary Student Research Program inspires girls to join the sciences

Now in its seventh year, this educational program encourages high school students to work with Argonne scientists. In 2018, students from Aqsa School investigated lithium-ion batteries at Argonne’s Advanced Photon Source.

April 27, 2018
Argonne chemists Ted Krause and Max Delferro (pictured) focus much of their work on single-site catalysts because of the promise they show for both high activity and product selectivity. Their work has led to several U.S. patent applications. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Cracking the catalytic code

In a variety of research programs, Argonne experts are finding ways to make cheaper and more efficient the manufacture of products derived from shale gas deposits and identifying new routes to higher-performance.

April 24, 2018
Argonne scientists are helping to solve the challenge of hypersonic flight by unraveling the complexities of combustion, which will propel aircraft to those speeds. (Image by Shutterstock / Andrey Yurlov.)
Going with the hypersonic flow

Argonne researcher Alan Kastengren is using X-rays to delve deeply into complexity challenges related to supersonic combustion in hypersonic vehicles, one of the most complex flow problems in science. Working through Argonne’s Advanced Photon Source and National Security Programs, he is helping clients like the Air Force Research Laboratory improve performance of the scramjet combustors that power hypersonic jets.

April 23, 2018
Scientists from Argonne National Laboratory and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, along with collaborators from over 25 other institutions, are recreating a previous experiment with much higher precision. The original experiment measured the spin precession of the muon — i.e., the speed at which its spin changes direction — to be different from the theoretical predictions. With this one, scientists plan to confirm or disprove the earlier results. (Image by Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory / Reidar Hahn.)
Muons spin tales of undiscovered particles

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) scientists are collaborating to test a magnetic property of the muon. The experiment could point to the existence of physics beyond our current understanding, including undiscovered particles.

April 19, 2018