Argonne National Laboratory

Feature Stories

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Argonne nanoscientist Xiao-Min Lin works with the shear cell device that enabled the new discovery in shear-thickening fluids. The polycarbonate cell holds the nanoparticle suspension and the mechanical response of the fluid is measured by the transducer in the rheometer above. The X-ray beam is focused on the sample from the left. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Through thick and thin

Researchers solve a decades-old question: Is particle ordering responsible for the thickening of some industrial products when stirred rapidly? The answer brings us one step closer to solving complex industrial production problems.

April 13, 2018
Summer interns Cayla Hamann (background) and Cheng Chang (foreground) help install a water sensor on the UChicago campus. (Image courtesy of The University of Chicago/ Xufeng Zhang.)
IME scientists dig deep in soil for data to improve agriculture, pollution

Soil is incredibly complex — full of organisms, microbes and chemicals that move and change constantly — and it all feeds into crop health and the Earth’s nutrient cycles in ways that aren’t fully understood. Recent advances in wireless data communications and the growing revolution of portable, cheap sensors have made it possible for scientists, including Profs. Monisha Ghosh and Supratik Guha, to start a pilot program to take real-time soil measurements.

January 12, 2018
Oleo Sponge picks up oil during tests at Argonne. (Image by Mark Lopez/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Nine ways Argonne advanced science and technology in 2017

As 2018 approaches, Argonne looks back at nine cool stories that came out of research projects and collaborations at the laboratory.

December 21, 2017
The researchers integrated X-ray imaging with computer modeling and simulation to characterize zinc oxide nanoparticles, which have attractive electrical properties for use in technologies. Shown above, from left to right, are co-authors Mathew Cherukara, Ross Harder, Haidan Wen and Kiran Sasikumar. (Image by Mark Lopez/Argonne National Laboratory)
X-ray imaging and computer modeling help map electric properties of nanomaterials

Argonne researchers have developed a new approach for studying piezoelectric materials using ultrafast 3-D X-ray imaging and computer modeling. Their integrated approach, reported in Nano Letters, can help us better understand material behavior and engineer more powerful and energy-efficient technologies.

May 4, 2017
Argonne researchers have created skyrmions – ordered regions of magnetic spins – by using a spiraling focused ion beam. (Illustration by Robert Horn / Argonne National Laboratory.)
Skyrmions created with a special spiral

Researchers at Argonne have found a way to control the creation of special textured surfaces, called skyrmions, in magnetically ordered materials.

April 5, 2017
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Four fantastic materials found at Argonne

New materials are the seeds for new technologies. Here are four discoveries with never-before-seen properties that could lead to new devices, innovations, or breakthroughs.

April 3, 2017
"To take the next step in nanoscience, we need to master reproduction and adaptation. How can we think about making it easier to repair individual units in artificial systems?"
Crowdsource: What will your field of science look like in 50 years?

CROWDSOURCE asks Argonne scientists from different disciplines to each provide a perspective on a complex question. Today we’re asking: What might your field of science look like in 50 years?

April 3, 2017
Scientists have used a new X-ray diffraction technique called Bragg single-angle ptychography to get a clear picture of how planes of atoms shift and squeeze under stress. (Image by Robert Horn/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Single-angle ptychography allows 3D imaging of stressed materials

Scientists have used a new X-ray diffraction technique called Bragg single-angle ptychography to get a clear picture of how planes of atoms shift and squeeze under stress.

March 21, 2017
In a new study, Argonne scientists have discovered a way to confine the behavior of electrons by using extremely high magnetic fields. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Electrons "puddle" under high magnetic fields, study reveals

In a new study, researchers used extremely high magnetic fields — equivalent to those found in the center of neutron stars — to alter electronic behavior. By observing the change in the behavior of these electrons, scientists may be able to gain an enriched understanding of material behavior.

January 3, 2017
The Argonne research team that has pioneered the use of machine learning tools in 2-D material modeling. (Image by Wes Agresta/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Machine learning enables predictive modeling of 2-D materials

In a study published in The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, a team of researchers led by Argonne computational scientist Subramanian Sankaranarayanan described their use of machine learning tools to create the first atomic-level model that accurately predicts the thermal properties of stanene, a 2-D material made up of a one-atom-thick sheet of tin.

December 7, 2016