Argonne National Laboratory

Feature Stories

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Argonne physicist Peter Mueller and his colleagues are selectively capturing and counting rare isotopes of krypton to determine the age of ice and groundwater. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Radiokrypton dating plumbs mysteries of water aquifers

Argonne physicists are using a unique, laser-based, atom-counting technique called Atom Trap Trace Analysis to selectively capture and count the krypton isotopes 81Kr and 85Kr to determine the age of ice and groundwater. The results provide valuable information about the dynamics, flow rates and direction of water in aquifers, particularly those vital to arid regions.

July 3, 2018
In late May, the Chicago chapter of the Association for Women in Science met at Argonne to celebrate the group’s 40th anniversary. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Celebrating 40 years of empowerment in science

Four decades ago, an ambitious group of women scientists at Argonne banded together to help form a group that would empower generations of women to come. In late May, they celebrated the 40th anniversary of that group, the Chicago Area Chapter of the Association for Women in Science (AWIS).

June 7, 2018
Four of the Department of Energy’s ‘Top 40’ research milestones since 1977 involved Argonne scientists. (Image courtesy of Claire Ballweg/Department of Energy and National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center.)
Reaching the Department of Energy’s ‘Top 40’

The U.S. Department of Energy honors Argonne researchers in top 40 research-paper countdown.

January 3, 2018
Oleo Sponge picks up oil during tests at Argonne. (Image by Mark Lopez/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Nine ways Argonne advanced science and technology in 2017

As 2018 approaches, Argonne looks back at nine cool stories that came out of research projects and collaborations at the laboratory.

December 21, 2017
Argonne scientists will be studying the physics of unusual atomic nuclei with this world-class gamma ray spectrometer. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Welcome back, GRETINA

GRETINA, a state-of-the-art gamma ray spectrometer, is back at Argonne and will be contributing to our knowledge of nuclear physics, the structure of subatomic nuclei and other ingredients of the universe.

December 6, 2017
By day, Argonne physicist Robert Wiringa studies nuclear physics - what's happening inside the nuclei of atoms.
The secret lives of scientists & engineers: Robert Wiringa

In this series, meet researchers from Argonne with unusual hobbies and interests. Today we're interviewing Robert Wiringa, a physicist who describes the behavior of atoms—and has collected more than 2,000 model ships.

April 3, 2017
Building project managers and scientific leads confer at the site of a new clean room under construction at Argonne National Laboratory. When completed, the lab will enable scientists and engineers to build extremely sensitive detectors — such as those capable of detecting light from the early days of the universe. (Image by Mark Lopez/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Building a room clean enough to make sensors to find light from the birth of the universe

Work is underway at Argonne on an expansion of its “clean room.” The new lab will be specially suited for building parts for ultra-sensitive detectors — such as those to carry out improved X-ray research, or for the South Pole Telescope to search for light from the early days of the universe.

October 17, 2016