Argonne National Laboratory

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Materials scientists at Argonne National Laboratory synthesized single crystals of a metallic trilayer nickelate compound, which shows similarities to a technologically valuable class of materials called high-temperature superconductors – and with the right ingredients, could potentially become one. Above: The crystal structure of such a compound. (Image credit: Zhang et. al, published in <em>Nature Physics</em>.)
Nickel for thought: Compound shows potential for high-temperature superconductivity

Argonne researchers have identified a nickel oxide compound as an unconventional but promising candidate material for high-temperature superconductivity. The project combined crystal growth, X-ray spectroscopy and computational theory.

June 16, 2017
Argonne chemists Dugan Hayes, Lin Chen, and Ryan Hadt have identified a rapid electronic process that could aid the water-splitting reaction in cobalt-containing catalysts.  Cobalt catalysts are relatively inexpensive and could replace more expensive precious metal catalysts in the production of clean energy, most notably solar fuels. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Chemical “dance” of cobalt catalysis could pave way to solar fuels

In a new study, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory and Harvard University have been able to see for the first time an especially important chemical step in the process of splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen – the basic reaction at the heart of creating entirely renewable fuels from solar energy.

June 2, 2017
Argonne chemist Max Delferro has developed an unusually active form of vanadium for hydrogenation reactions.  Vanadium an inexpensive common metal that could replace some of the precious metals currently found in catalysts used in these reactions, frequently used in processing of petrochemicals. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Argonne scientists make vanadium into a useful catalyst for hydrogenation

In a new study, Argonne chemist Max Delferro boosted and analyzed the unprecedented catalytic activity of an element called vanadium for hydrogenation – a reaction that is used for making everything from vegetable oils to petrochemical products to vitamins.

May 25, 2017
Snapshots of the 3-D structure of iron nanoparticles in the course of the oxidation process, captured through large-scale reactive molecular dynamic simulations. These simulations enhance our understanding of processes like oxidation and corrosion, and build a foundation for developing integrated imaging techniques to control or manipulate these types of reactions. (Image by Yugang Sun, Xiaobing Zuo, Subramanian Sankaranarayanan, Sheng Peng, Badri Narayanan and Ganesh Kamath, Argonne National Laboratory/Temple University.)
New study reveals the mystery behind the formation of hollowed nanoparticles during metal oxidation

In a newly published Science paper, Argonne and Temple University researchers by integrated X-ray imaging and computer modeling and simulation to reveal new knowledge about the behavior of metal nanoparticles when they undergo oxidation. This knowledge adds to our understanding of fundamental processes like oxidation and corrosion.

April 21, 2017
Argonne researchers are the first to capture the formation of nanomaterial defects in near-real time. Their work will help other researchers model the behavior of materials, a step that is key to engineering stronger, more reliable materials. (Image by Mark Lopez/Argonne National Laboratory.)
For first time ever, X-ray imaging at Argonne captures material defect process

Researchers at Argonne have discovered a new approach to detail the formation of material defects at the atomic scale and in near-real time, an important step that could assist in engineering better and stronger new materials.

January 16, 2017
A new study by Argonne researchers determined that magnetic skyrmions – small electrically uncharged circular structures with a spiraling magnetic pattern – do get deflected by an applied current, much like a curveball getting deflected by air. (Photo by Mark Lopez, Argonne National Laboratory)
Argonne ahead of the “curve” in magnetic study

In a new study by Argonne researchers, scientists noticed that magnetic skyrmions – small electrically uncharged circular structures with a spiraling magnetic pattern – do get deflected by an applied current, much like a curveball gets deflected by airflow.

September 21, 2016
Former Argonne postdoctoral researcher Diana Berman and Argonne nanoscientist Anirudha Sumant, along with several collaborators, developed a new and inexpensive way to grow pure graphene using a diamond substrate. (Wes Agresta/Argonne National Laboratory)
Diamond proves useful material for growing graphene

A team has developed a method to grow graphene that contains relatively few impurities, and costs less to make, in a shorter time and at lower temperatures compared to the processes widely used to make graphene today.

September 16, 2016
Argonne researchers, from left, Subramanian Sankaranarayanan, Badri Narayanan, Ali Erdemir, Giovanni Ramirez and  Osman Levent Eryilmaz show off metal engine parts that have been treated with a diamond-like carbon coating similar to one developed and explored by the team. The catalytic coating interacts with engine oil to create a self-healing diamond-like film that could have profound implications for the efficiency and durability of future engines. (photo by Wes Agresta)
Argonne discovery yields self-healing diamond-like carbon

A group of researchers at Argonne discovered a revolutionary diamond-like film that is generated by the heat and pressure of an automotive engine. The discovery of this ultra-durable, self-lubricating tribofilm could have profound implications for the efficiency and durability of future engines and other moving metal parts.

August 5, 2016
Switchgrass is one of the five crops modeled for local soil carbon sequestration rates in an Argonne study that predicts the impact of different biofuel crops on soil carbon across the country. (photo credit: hjochen/Shutterstock)
Modeling predicts which counties could store more carbon in soil by growing bioenergy crops

To help stakeholders in government and business make smart decisions about the best types of land and local climates for planting bioenergy crops, researchers at Argonne are using computational modeling to predict which counties could see increases in soil organic carbon from cultivation of crops for biofuels.

July 13, 2016
Argonne physicist Jeff Eastman holds a thin oxide film which dramatically increases its conductivity when a small current is applied. The discovery could be useful in studies for better electronics or catalysts. Photo by Mark Lopez/Argonne National Laboratory.
A new way to control oxygen for electronic properties

Researchers at Argonne found they could use a small electric current to introduce oxygen voids, or vacancies, that dramatically change the conductivity of thin oxide films.

June 9, 2016