Argonne National Laboratory

Press Releases

Date Postedsort ascending
Scott Pinkerton, the Cyber Fed Model program manager at Argonne, made a keynote presentation last November during a workshop at the Siemens’ Corporate Technology and Mobility headquarters in Munich, Germany. The Cyber Fed Model that Pinkerton and his colleagues have developed provides near-real-time local detection and global protection capabilities against cyberattacks. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Detect locally, protect globally

Argonne’s Cyber Fed Model provides a community-based system for near-real-time dissemination of cyberthreat indicators, defensive measures, and tools to simplify use of this information. Once the system detects an attack, it rapidly repairs the local damage while also preventing its spread.

January 18, 2018
A comparison of the theoretical calculations (top row) and inelastic neutron scattering data from ARCS at the Spallation Neutron Source (bottom row) shows the excellent agreement between the two. The three figures represent different slices through the four-dimensional scattering volumes produced by the electronic excitations. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Breaking bad metals with neutrons

By combining the latest developments in neutron scattering and theory, researchers are close to predicting phenomena like superconductivity and magnetism in strongly correlated electron systems. It is likely that the next advances in superconductivity and magnetism will come from such systems, but they might also be used in completely new ways such as quantum computing.

January 11, 2018
Secretary of Energy Rick Perry (second from right) toured the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility with Rick Stevens, Associate Laboratory Director for the Computing, Environment and Life Sciences Directorate (third from left). Accompanying the Secretary were Argonne Director Paul Kearns (far left), U.S. Representative Bill Foster (second from left), DOE’s Joanna M. Livengood (right) and others. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Argonne welcomes Department of Energy Secretary Perry

U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Rick Perry visited Argonne National Laboratory yesterday, getting a first-hand view of the multifaceted and interdisciplinary research program laboratory of the Department.

January 10, 2018
Argonne scientists Khalil Amine and David Streets have been named to the Web of Science’s Highly Cited List of 2017. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Two Argonne scientists recognized for a decade of breakthroughs

Two scientists with the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory have been named to the Web of Science’s Highly Cited List of 2017, ranking in the top 1 percent of their peers by citations and subject area. Materials Scientist Khalil Amine and Energy and Environmental Policy Scientist David Streets say they are thrilled to see their work — and the laboratory — recognized in such a way.

January 10, 2018
Argonne researchers have gotten a better look at how the molecular structures of organic solar cells form, which provides new insights that can improve their efficiency. (Image courtesy of Shutterstock / Dave Weaver.)
Going organic

Using Argonne’s Advanced Photon Source, researchers analyzed how organic solar cells’ crystal structures develop as they are produced under different conditions. With the APS, researchers learned how certain additives affect the microstructures obtained, providing new insights that can improve the cells’ efficiency.

January 9, 2018
John Quintana has been named Argonne's Deputy Laboratory Director for Operations and Chief Operations Officer (COO). (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
John Quintana named Deputy Laboratory Director for Operations and Chief Operations Officer

John Quintana has been named Deputy Laboratory Director for Operations and Chief Operations Officer (COO) of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory.

January 4, 2018
Argonne scientists and their collaborators have used a new and counterintuitive approach to balance three important factors — activity, stability and conductivity — in a new catalyst designed for splitting water. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
A catalytic balancing act

Scientists have recently used a new and counterintuitive approach to create a better catalyst that supports one of the reactions involved in splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen. By first creating an alloy of two of the densest naturally occurring elements and then removing one, the scientists reshaped the remaining material’s structure so that it better balanced three important factors: activity, stability and conductivity.

December 21, 2017
A research team that included Argonne chemist Stephen Klippenstein examined the production of hydroxyl radicals, which help break down air pollutants, in a new light. (Credit: Shutterstock / chuyuss)
Clearing the air

A greater understanding of the dynamics of chemical reactions is leading to better models of atmospheric chemistry. Through this work, scientists are gaining insight into a key chemical able to break down some major air pollutants.

December 13, 2017
By heating the anode material to a much lower temperature (less than 260°C), scientists could remove the water near the surface, but retain the water in the bulk of the material, which enhanced its characteristics. Credit: <em>Nature Communications</em> and study authors. Licensed <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode"><em>here</em></a>. Image was resized.
The wet road to fast and stable batteries

An international team of scientists —– including several researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory — – has discovered an anode battery material with superfast charging and stable operation over many thousands of cycles.

December 12, 2017
A <em>Nature</em> study describes how Argonne and collaborating institutions helped develop a new way of converting methane to methanol using rhodium-based catalysts. (Image credit: Shutterstock / Double Brain)
Making fuel out of thick air

In a new study, researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, Tufts University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory teamed up to explore the potential of rhodium-based catalysts for this conversion under milder conditions.

December 7, 2017