Argonne National Laboratory

Press Releases

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Researchers from Argonne and the University of California at Santa Barbara have identified another elemental actor that helps activate palladium while reducing the amount of the precious metal needed for reactions to occur. (Image by Shutterstock / clearviewstock.)
Nickel in the X-ray limelight

Argonne scientists and collaborators have identified another elemental actor in catalytic reactions that helps activate palladium while reducing the amount of the precious metal needed for those reactions to occur.

March 26, 2018
Using Argonne’s Advanced Photon Source, researchers identified a form of water known as Ice-VII, which was trapped within diamonds that crystallized deep in the Earth’s mantle. (Image courtesy of the University of Chicago.)
Argonne’s powerful X-rays key to confirming water source deep below Earth’s surface

A study published in Science last week relies on extremely bright X-ray beams from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory to confirm the presence of naturally occurring water at least 410 kilometers below the Earth’s surface. This exciting discovery could change our understanding of how water circulates deep in the Earth’s mantle and how heat escapes from the lower regions of our planet.

March 23, 2018
Why do some insects that drink liquid have two pumps in their heads, while others have only one? A multi-institutional team traveled to the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne and found that the two pumps allow for a secondary ‘burst mode’ of feeding. This, potentially, gives an insect with two pumps more options and allows for multi-modal feeding. (Image by Jake Socha et. al / Virginia Tech.)
Argonne’s X-rays used to identify new mode of drinking in mosquitos

Mosquitos may have a reputation for being one of the world’s most intractable pests, but they are actually quite tiny and fragile.

March 22, 2018
Argonne team members (from left to right): Rajeev Assary, Cong Liu, Badri Narayanan, Anh Ngo and Larry Curtiss. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Out of thin air

Argonne researchers conducted basic science computational studies as part of a collaboration with researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago to design a “beyond-lithium-ion” battery cell that operates by running on air over many charge and discharge cycles. The design offers energy storage capacity about three times that of a lithium-ion battery, with significant potential for further improvements.

March 21, 2018
Argonne and Brookhaven researchers observed two kinds of defects forming in individual nanowires, depicted here. These nanowires are smaller in diameter than a human hair. (Image by Megan Hill/Northwestern University.)
Scientists have a new way to gauge the growth of nanowires

In a new study, researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne and Brookhaven National Laboratories observed the formation of two kinds of defects in individual nanowires, which are smaller in diameter than a human hair.

March 19, 2018
Keeping cyber attackers at bay in 2017, the team from the University of Illinois at Chicago won Argonne’s second annual Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
United States Department of Energy to host multi-laboratory Cyber Defense Competition

In less than one month, over a hundred college students from across the United States will convene in one of the largest cyber defense competitions in the nation. The event, hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy, will take place on April 6-7, 2018. This event will be simultaneously hosted across three of the Department’s national laboratories: Argonne, Oak Ridge and Pacific Northwest. The completion challenges students to respond to a scenario based on a real-world challenge of vital importance: protecting the Nation’s energy critical infrastructure from the cyber threat.

March 15, 2018
In a new study, Argonne and University of Lille chemists explored protactinium’s multiple resemblances to more completely understand the relationship between the transition metals and the complex chemistry of the early actinide elements. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory and Shutterstock / Humdan.)
The element of surprise

In a new study from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Lille in France, chemists have explored protactinium’s multiple resemblances to more completely understand the relationship between the transition metals and the complex chemistry of the early actinide elements.

March 14, 2018
Nitrogen oxides are significant pollutants to the atmosphere. Argonne chemist Stephen Klippenstein co-authored a new review paper that compiled decades of data to create a model of how these pollutants are produced. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory. Home page banner image courtesy of Shutterstock / Natalya Erofeeva.)
Painting a clear picture of how nitrogen oxides are formed

For decades, combustion researchers and engine companies have been seeking to understand how these gases are produced during combustion so that they can find ways to reduce them. Now Argonne researchers have synthesized more than a decade’s worth of combustion studies to create a new overarching model of how nitrogen oxides are produced.

March 9, 2018
In a recent study, Argonne researchers helped determine the rate at which reforested and undisturbed forest soils absorb carbon from the atmosphere. They found that in the next 100 years, already existing reforestation in the country could help topsoil absorb an additional 2 billion tons of carbon. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Locked in a forest

Argonne researchers have found that in the next 100 years, already existing reforestation in the country could help topsoil absorb an additional 2 billion tons of carbon. Their work is detailed in a recent study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

March 8, 2018
Daniel Lopez, Nanofabrication and Devices Group Leader at Argonne’s Center for Nanoscale Materials (right), Federico Capasso, Harvard’s Robert L. Wallace Professor of Applied Physics (left), and four other collaborators have created a smaller, more advanced sensing technology that can be used in a variety of applications including systems that scan the surroundings of self-driving cars and trucks. (Image courtesy of Harvard University.)
A marriage of light-manipulation technologies

Researchers from Argonne and Harvard University built a metasurface-based lens atop a Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) platform. The result is a new, infrared light-focusing system that combines the best features of both technologies while reducing the size of the optical system.

February 27, 2018