Argonne National Laboratory

Press Releases

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Daniel Lopez, Nanofabrication and Devices Group Leader at Argonne’s Center for Nanoscale Materials (right), Federico Capasso, Harvard’s Robert L. Wallace Professor of Applied Physics (left), and four other collaborators have created a smaller, more advanced sensing technology that can be used in a variety of applications including systems that scan the surroundings of self-driving cars and trucks. (Image courtesy of Harvard University.)
A marriage of light-manipulation technologies

Researchers from Argonne and Harvard University built a metasurface-based lens atop a Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) platform. The result is a new, infrared light-focusing system that combines the best features of both technologies while reducing the size of the optical system.

February 27, 2018
Leslie Krohn has been named Chief Communications Officer at Argonne National Laboratory. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Krohn named Argonne Communications Officer

Leslie Krohn has been named Chief Communications Officer at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory.

February 23, 2018
Argonne scientists and collaborators used the Gammasphere, this powerful gamma ray spectrometer, to help create the right conditions to cause and spot a long-theorized effect called nuclear excitation by electron capture. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Captured electrons excite nuclei to higher energy states

For the first time, scientists demonstrated a long-theorized nuclear effect called nuclear excitation by electron capture. This advance tests theoretical models that describe how nuclear and atomic realms interact and may also provide new insights into how star elements are created.

February 9, 2018
A research team led by Argonne’s Giulia Galli has gleaned new insights about the structure of salt water by simulating the liquid at the molecular level with the Mira supercomputer, housed at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility. (Image courtesy of Giulia Galli and Alex Gaiduk/Institute for Molecular Engineering.)
Study of salts in water causing stir

A pair of Argonne scientists uncover fresh insights about the structure of saltwater.

February 1, 2018
Argonne researchers and their collaborators sought to understand what happens when an electron is injected into water. They found that the electron binds with the water; however, its binding energy is much smaller than previously thought. (Image courtesy of Peter Allen/Institute for Molecular Engineering.)
Electrons in the water

Scientists have been able to experimentally measure the electron affinity of water, determining what happens to an electron when it is injected into water. The result has importance for photochemical cells and may force scientists to a reexamine certain theories about electronic binding energy.

January 19, 2018
In a newly discovered twist, Argonne scientists and collaborators found that palladium nanoparticles can repair atomic dislocations in their crystal structure. This self-healing behavior could be worth exploring in other materials. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
On the rebound

New research from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory and Stanford University has found that palladium nanoparticles can repair atomic dislocations in their crystal structure, potentially leading to other advances in material science.

January 19, 2018
Scott Pinkerton, the Cyber Fed Model program manager at Argonne, made a keynote presentation last November during a workshop at the Siemens’ Corporate Technology and Mobility headquarters in Munich, Germany. The Cyber Fed Model that Pinkerton and his colleagues have developed provides near-real-time local detection and global protection capabilities against cyberattacks. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Detect locally, protect globally

Argonne’s Cyber Fed Model provides a community-based system for near-real-time dissemination of cyberthreat indicators, defensive measures, and tools to simplify use of this information. Once the system detects an attack, it rapidly repairs the local damage while also preventing its spread.

January 18, 2018
A comparison of the theoretical calculations (top row) and inelastic neutron scattering data from ARCS at the Spallation Neutron Source (bottom row) shows the excellent agreement between the two. The three figures represent different slices through the four-dimensional scattering volumes produced by the electronic excitations. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Breaking bad metals with neutrons

By combining the latest developments in neutron scattering and theory, researchers are close to predicting phenomena like superconductivity and magnetism in strongly correlated electron systems. It is likely that the next advances in superconductivity and magnetism will come from such systems, but they might also be used in completely new ways such as quantum computing.

January 11, 2018
Secretary of Energy Rick Perry (second from right) toured the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility with Rick Stevens, Associate Laboratory Director for the Computing, Environment and Life Sciences Directorate (third from left). Accompanying the Secretary were Argonne Director Paul Kearns (far left), U.S. Representative Bill Foster (second from left), DOE’s Joanna M. Livengood (right) and others. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Argonne welcomes Department of Energy Secretary Perry

U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Rick Perry visited Argonne National Laboratory yesterday, getting a first-hand view of the multifaceted and interdisciplinary research program laboratory of the Department.

January 10, 2018
Argonne scientists Khalil Amine and David Streets have been named to the Web of Science’s Highly Cited List of 2017. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)
Two Argonne scientists recognized for a decade of breakthroughs

Two scientists with the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory have been named to the Web of Science’s Highly Cited List of 2017, ranking in the top 1 percent of their peers by citations and subject area. Materials Scientist Khalil Amine and Energy and Environmental Policy Scientist David Streets say they are thrilled to see their work — and the laboratory — recognized in such a way.

January 10, 2018