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Quantum Computing

Argonne is building quantum computing and networking infrastructure that use quantum phenomena to enable groundbreaking applications. This work employs supercomputers to simulate the behavior of the underlying quantum materials, devices and algorithms.

Scientists at Argonne are addressing some of the most fundamental challenges in computing and communication with the goal of enabling scalable, long-distance quantum communication and efficient use of quantum computers. Development of quantum networks is motivated by new applications, such as exquisitely accurate clock synchronization or secure communication. Similarly, quantum computing is expected to revolutionize fields with high societal impact, such as quantum chemistry, optimization and machine learning.

Our work on quantum communication in a 52-mile, fiber-optic testbed showcases many of the technologies developed at Argonne that will help lay the foundation for a quantum internet. For example, quantum memories will enable realization of fully functional repeater nodes that will securely relay quantum signals through the quantum network. Experiments are complemented by quantum network architecture research and simulations that seek optimal placement of components, desired functionality of hardware, and specification of control protocols to enable quantum communication at the intercontinental scale.

Computer scientists and physicists at Argonne also work side by side on computational research that spans the entire quantum computing software stack, including development of new quantum algorithms, error mitigation strategies, pulse optimization techniques and quantum compilers. Significant research efforts also focus on the use of supercomputers at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science User Facility, to simulate quantum circuits, evaluate the effectiveness of various components of the quantum software stack, and model quantum devices at an unprecedented scale and fidelity.

Artist’s interpretation of ​“hypersurfaces” embedded in ​“noise space.” By combining experiments at different noise rates (spheres) and fitting hypersurfaces to the data (surfaces), Argonne scientists are able to recover ​“noise-free” quantum information.
Related Project

Exploring lossy quantum computation

Quantum computers are subject to inevitable noise processes. A theoretical understanding of noise can help lead to more efficient quantum computations.