Skip to main content
Technology Commercialization and Partnerships Division

NbTi-Superconductor-Based Superconducting Undulators

Technology Available for Licensing

NbTi-superconductor-based SCU could pave the way to expanding the X-ray energy range at existing light sources without increasing the electron beam energy.

The SCU technology could be attractive to most existing and newly developed light sources. The cost of any light source is mainly defined by the energy of the electron beam, and so any equipment that permits to minimize that energy without cost escalation will find its way to future light source facilities. SCUs would serve exactly this function, and also will expand the number and type of scientific experiments that can be performed at light sources.

Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory’s Advanced Photon Source, a U.S. Department of Energy User Facility, have engineered the development of NbTi-superconductor based superconducting undulators, or SCUs. 

This technology is being shared with other researchers seeking the technology to make X-ray lasers more powerful, versatile, compact and durable.

Argonne Accelerator Systems Division engineer Matt Kasa checks the instrumentation of the undulator.

Summary 

The Accelerator Division at the APS has successfully developed a NbTi-superconductor -based SCU, a significant achievement could pave the way to expanding the X-ray energy range at existing light sources without increasing the electron beam energy. 

Argonne is now offering for licensing the complete set of engineering drawings that have been used for the fabrication of existing SCUs, and the manual with the comprehensive description of the SCU assembly and testing procedures. 

The SCU technology could be attractive to most existing and newly developed light sources. The cost of any light source is mainly defined by the energy of the electron beam, and so any equipment that permits to minimize that energy without cost escalation will find its way to future light source facilities. SCUs would serve exactly this function, and also will expand the number and type of scientific experiments that can be performed at light sources. 

APS SCUs 

The APS team successfully built and tested several SCUs. Two of them are currently operate at the APS storage ring providing APS users with the brightest hard x-ray beam. 

The niobium-titanium-based SCU, for which the licensing is available, has been designed to meet all challenging technical requirements applied to the 3-rd generation of x-ray sources and X-ray free electron lasers. It includes high-precision field quality and precise positioning of the undulator magnet. The APS SCU team validated the performance of the SCU using in-house-developed cryogenic systems and magnetic measurement techniques.